Em. Kay. Dee.

sfmoma:

Happy birthday to Sol LeWitt, born on this day in 1928! Starting from the radical idea that an artwork’s concept is more important than its form, Sol LeWitt helped revolutionize the definition of art in the 1960s.
LISTEN: Artists Sol LeWitt and Tom Marioni and curator Gary Garrels discuss LeWitt’s wall drawings and the birth of conceptual art→This photo, taken by SFMOMA staffer Don Ross, shows our installation crew working on Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #935: Color bands in four directions, which was on view in our Atrium back in 2000. View Larger

sfmoma:

Happy birthday to Sol LeWitt, born on this day in 1928! 

Starting from the radical idea that an artwork’s concept is more important than its form, Sol LeWitt helped revolutionize the definition of art in the 1960s.

LISTEN: Artists Sol LeWitt and Tom Marioni and curator Gary Garrels discuss LeWitt’s wall drawings and the birth of conceptual art→

This photo, taken by SFMOMA staffer Don Ross, shows our installation crew working on Sol LeWitt’s Wall Drawing #935: Color bands in four directions, which was on view in our Atrium back in 2000.


Sometimes. I really hate. Tank tops. I don’t even know how to properly spell tank top.

Tanktop
Tank top
Tank-top


momatalks:




our first image/text submission…


Sunday Post: The Thing We Search For 

She is there and I am here, imagining each other beyond the camera that is always there between us. She is real and I am real, but in the moment abstracted. I whisper directions yet somehow she hears though it is no longer her I speak to but the image that is there somewhere inside the camera. And I care for her, I care for her in a way I can not name, not in a physical way, not as a man cares for a woman but in a way that seems somehow more important, as an artist cares for art though those terms seem too small and the thing that I care for and the thing that I am I have no words to describe.
We enter the room and it is always the same, the same walls, the same carpet, the same image we are trying to create, a perfect one-sixtieth of a second. It is as real as we are and we search for it as one searches the darkness of a field with only the light of a single candle, our hand cupped about the flame against a wind that blows, a wind that carries the words and thoughts of others trying to define the thing we search for.
Model, NXWords and Image, Reverend Bobby Anger


View Larger

momatalks:

our first image/text submission…
Sunday Post: The Thing We Search For

She is there and I am here, imagining each other beyond the camera that is always there between us.

She is real and I am real, but in the moment abstracted. I whisper directions yet somehow she hears though it is no longer her I speak to but the image that is there somewhere inside the camera.

And I care for her, I care for her in a way I can not name, not in a physical way, not as a man cares for a woman but in a way that seems somehow more important, as an artist cares for art though those terms seem too small and the thing that I care for and the thing that I am I have no words to describe.

We enter the room and it is always the same, the same walls, the same carpet, the same image we are trying to create, a perfect one-sixtieth of a second. It is as real as we are and we search for it as one searches the darkness of a field with only the light of a single candle, our hand cupped about the flame against a wind that blows, a wind that carries the words and thoughts of others trying to define the thing we search for.

Model, NX
Words and Image, Reverend Bobby Anger